These are the maps that I used to construct the flash animation that opens this web-based project.



 
1849
Map of Chicago and Vicinity, Rees and Rucker, Surveyor: William Clogher, courtesy of the Chicago History Museum. See entire map.
1851
Map of the City of Chicago, Printed by D. Morse Microfiche paper copy from the Newberry Library. From Library of Congress Photoduplication Service.

1861
Plat map of Cook County, Cartography, W.L. Flower, courtesy of the Chicago History Museum. See entire map.

1862
Guide Map of Chicago, Creator: Rufus Blanchard, courtesy of the Chicago History Museum. See entire map.

1863
Plat of Cemetery Park, from IJ Bryan's History of Lincoln Park, 1899 (an early plan to keep the cemetery, landscaping the grounds to the north).
1864
Charles Shober map. Microfiche paper copy from the Newberry Library. From Library of Congress Photoduplication Service.
1870
Plan of Lincoln Park, from IJ Bryan's History of Lincoln Park, 1899 (By 1870 neither the Milliman Tract nor the rest of the cemetery was entirely vacated by lot owners. Headstones still marked graves.)
1871
Guide Map of Chicago, Creator: Rufus Blanchard, courtesy of the Chicago History Museum. See entire map. (This rendering marks the "Rebel Graves", as well as shows the park layout plan, not yet implemented.)

1872
This adaptation of Blanchard's map shows (in white) areas that were affected by the 1871 Chicago Fire.

1872
Blanchard & Eastman Microfiche paper copy from the Newberry Library. From Library of Congress Photoduplication Service.

1872
Peltzer’s Atlas of the City of Chicago: Plan of Lincoln Park, courtesy of the Illinois Regional Archive Depository at Northeastern Illinois University (an artist's rendering of a park plan)

1873
Plat illustration, from IJ Bryan's History of Lincoln Park, 1899. (This survey map shows sections of the Milliman Tract not yet acquired by the City or the Lincoln Park commissioners. It also identifies the not-yet-obtained grounds once occupied by Chicago's first Jewish Cemetery, as well as the pier constructed by J.V. Farwell that gathered sand with the lake's current to increase his land holding by 16 acres.)
1895
Original unsigned plat map, by permission and courtesy of the Chicago Park District Special Collections. (This hand drawn map notes the purchase of the Jewish Cemetery in 1882, as well as the prices of $138,000 for a portion of the Milliman Tract, and $1000 for the purchase of the Peacock family vault lots. The unclaimed family cemetery lots were acquired by the Lincoln Park Commissioners by condemnation. The expanded Farwell Tract was bought in 1875 for $100,000.)
1938
Plat made during the WPA expansion of Lincoln Park showing survey information of the Milliman Tract area. By permission and courtesy of the Chicago Park District Special Collections. (Notice original 1848 shoreline and subsequent landfill and lagoon addition.)

1873
Plan of Lincoln Park, Designed by Nelson & Benson, Landscape Gardeners, Published with Peltzer’s Atlas of Chicago (detail) Courtesy of the Illinois Regional Depository Archive, Northeastern Illinois University.

1875
This detail from a city map published by Warner & Beers continues to show the cemetery layout south of Wisconsin Street while other maps are illustrating various park landscape plans.

1879
Map of Chicago, H.R. Page and Co., courtesy of the Chicago History Museum. See entire map.

1886
Rand McNally Map of Chicago, courtesy of the Chicago History Museum. See entire map. (The city limit was designated at Fullerton Avenue at this time.)

1886
Robinson’s Atlas of the City of Chicago, courtesy of the Chicago History Museum. See entire map. (This map detail shows the area that was the Catholic Cemetery with the lots identified and sparcely occupied by new buildings. The Cardinal's estate still occupies the same ground as illustrated above.)

1886
Robinson’s Atlas of the City of Chicago, courtesy of the Chicago History Museum. See entire map. (This is a different detail of the map to the left.)

1892
Rand McNally & Co's standard map of Chicago, courtesy of the University of Chicago Library. See entire map. (This map shows the first formation of the lagoon and an inlet of water, with the addition of the breakwater carriage drive and sidewalk.)

 

1897
New map of Chicago showing street car lines in colors and street numbers in even hundreds, Rufus Blanchard, courtesy of the University of Chicago Library. See entire map.

1897-1899
Street Guide Map of Chicago, Rand McNally & Co., courtesy of the University of Chicago Library. See entire map. (This map shows the Lincoln Park property extending down the new Lake Shore Drive.)

1899
Map of Lincoln Park (detail), from IJ Bryan's History of Lincoln Park.

1910
Rand McNally & Co.’s New Street Number Guide Map of Chicago (detail), courtesy of the University of Chicago Library. See entire map. (This map shows the Lincoln Park property extending down Lake Shore Drive, as well as down Dearborn Avenue and State Street to Burton Place, the grounds of the old Catholic Cemetery.)

1917
Map of Lincoln Park, from Official Automobile Blue Book, Volume C., page 55. See the entire book.
1920s
This map, courtesy of the Harold Washington Library Center, illustrates the designation of Lincoln Park by the green-colored areas.
1920s
This topographical map, courtesy of the Harold Washington Library Center, shows the elevated land areas.

1925
Lakeview and Lincoln (detail), Blue line print, University of Chicago Department of Sociology. See entire map.

Contemporary Topographical map, Harold Washington Library Center. (In 1938, as part of the Workers Progress Administration work, LaSalle Drive was extended to join with Lake Shore Drive. During this time the lagoon was shortened and the lake filled to its current shoreline.)
Contemporary GoogleTM Map. See a broader and interactive version of this map.
Google SatelliteTM map, produced by NASA. See a broader and interactive satellite map.

 

Pamela Bannos © 2014
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